AkzoNobel and Itaconix finalized first bio-based polymer application agreement

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AkzoNobel’s Specialty Chemicals business has finalized the first application agreement for bio-based polymers to result from its collaboration with UK specialty polymers company Itaconix. Announced earlier this year, the joint development agreement involves AkzoNobel’s Performance Additives unit developing applications for Itaconix polymers to be used in the coatings and construction industries.

“We are pleased to be announcing the first in a series of agreements to develop these polymers for commercial use,” said Peter Nieuwenhuizen, RD&I Director for AkzoNobel’s Specialty Chemicals business. Nieuwenhuizen detailed the development during a presentation at the end of July at the BIO World Congress on Industrial Biotechnology in Montreal, Canada.

“Being able to incorporate polymers made from renewable bio-based raw materials will give a significant sustainability advantage for our customers and also fits closely with our own Planet Possible sustainability agenda of doing more with less,” he said.

Under the agreement, Itaconix will contribute its proprietary polymers from itaconic acid, which are obtained from sugars through fermentation. “In addition to applications in coatings and construction materials – continued Nieuwenhuizen – bio-based polymers have the potential to be used in a range of other everyday essentials, ranging from improving water quality to cleaning and hygiene products.”

“This is – Kevin Matthews, CEO of Itaconix, added – the first commercial step in our joint development agreement to collaborate on delivering valuable solutions to AkzoNobel customers with the novel performance of our polymers.  We are excited to further strengthen our relationship with AkzoNobel and look forward to combining their deep application knowledge with our unique chemistries to build key product positions in these large and important markets.”

Nieuwenhuizen also pointed out that the collaboration with Itaconix is another example of AkzoNobel’s approach to embracing open innovation to help find more sustainable solutions. The company recently announced the winners of its Imagine Chemistry open innovation challenge, which included start-ups working in fermentation and with bio-based raw materials.

 

 

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